INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE:
RETHINKING THE STATE IN GLOBALIZED CAPITALISM

Rio de Janeiro 21-23 March 2018 Colégio Brasileiro de Alto Estudos/UFRJ

Brasília 26-27 March 2018 Escola Nacional de Administração Pública/ENAP

PROGRAM and Presentations – Rio de Janeiro

OVERVIEW

FIRST SESSION

Mapping the terrain 1: Geo-political shifts, Political Coalitions – Searching for feasible State Strategies

How much “policy space” is available for transformative agendas and whether the state has the capacity to take advantage of the opportunities available depends on a balance of forces, globally, within society and economy at the national level and internal to the state. The power of global capital restricts and constrains possibilities for state action, especially in the global south. National political institutions include both potentially useful elements and as impediments. Figuring out how to connect progressive elements of existing political institutions, a mobilized, organized civil society, and the existing organizational capacity of the state itself is central to rethinking the state. How can this set of diversely situated actors forge political coalitions, evaluate strategic priorities and build a consensus around a positive agenda for a democratic domestic policy space? How can well-meaning but counter-productive efforts be avoided?

In the 21st century, the socio-political and economic contours of this terrain have been complicated by significant changes in the geo-political order. The neoliberal order dominated by the U.S. and its OECD allies has been replaced by a more uncertain hierarchy in which the increasingly important presence of China must be taken into account as well the current incoherence of U.S. policy. The resulting uncertainties complicate the terrain that States and other political actors must navigate.

Possible additional themes: How to take into account new Ideological currents and the exhaustion of “traditional” policy agendas (right and left) that increase the sway of disruptive currents: including political radicalization, the “revolt of the elites” and the “rethread” of the left; the interplay of religious fundamentalisms and the “re-enchantment of the world”?

2:00 – 3:45 PM 
Chair: Fernando de Barros Gontijo Filgueiras 
Participants: Peter Evans, Renato Boschi, Carlos Pinho, Fred Block

3:45 – 5:00 PM 
Chair: Flávio Gaitán 
Participants: Anna Jaguaribe, Kristen Hopewell, Paulo Nogueira Batista Jr.

5:15 – 6:15 PM  
General Discussion: Flávio Gaitán, Maria Antonieta Leopoldi

PRESENTATIONS

Anna JaguaribeGlobal Asymmetries And National Space: The Case Of China

Fred BlockCapitalism: The Future of an Illusion

Peter EvansCan Civil Society Save us?

Renato Boschi and Carlos PinhoCapitalist Development, Crisis, and the State in Brazil

OPENING SESSION and SECOND SESSION

Mapping the terrain 2: Macro and Finance: Financial Globalization, Domestic Policy Space and State Capacities

Opening Session: March 22 – 9:00 – 9:30AM

Renato Boschi (INCT-PPED),  

Francisco Gaetani (President, ENAP).  

Second Session: March 22 – 9:30 AM - 1:15 PM

Financial globalization is a fact. So is the increased frequency and acuteness of financial crises that it has come with it. Are there feasible strategies that might transform the existing system of global finance? The current the western financial system is destructively extractive. It deprives public actors of the ability to direct resources where they are needed to produce positive change. It is also dangerously unstable, making periodic crises, which destroy the assets of ordinary people, almost inevitable. It has the effect of shrinking domestic policy space will continue to do so if key issues are not addressed: financial regulation and development, the current state of monetary and fiscal policies; tax reforms; long term funding structures and regulating financial innovations.

Possible themes: Global finance after the crisis: how did it change? Financial governance and Development anything new? Central banks under stress; Regulating financial innovation: how? The urgent need for a long term-oriented financial structure, and for a development-oriented tax code. Does the rise of China imply a new financial governance model?

9:00 – 10:45  AM
Chair: Cláudio Amitrano  
Participants: Jan Kregel, Leonardo Burlamaqui, Rogério Studart

10:45 – 12:00 AM 
Chair: Leonardo Burlamaqui  
Participants: Andrew Fischer, Esther Dweck, Paulo Nogueira Batista Jr.

12:00 AM – 1:15 PM 
General Discussion: Carlos Santana, Lavínia Barros de Castro

PRESENTATIONS

Esther DweckThe current state of macroeconomic theory and the role of fiscal policy: what have they learned?

Jan Kregel Capitalism Mapping the terrain 2 – Macro and Finance: Financial Globalization, Domestic Policy Space and State Capacities

Rogério Studart The gates are wide open: international finance in times of extreme dis-functionality

THIRD SESSION

Mapping the terrain 3: Industry 4.0, Production, Employment and Managing creative destruction

20th century modernist projections saw technological change as the engine of expanded leisure and increased well-being. 21st century realities appear more dystopian. Technology is deployed to increase profits, reduce working people’s ability to share in a more productive economy and to make work more precarious and oppressive. We are living in the first stages of a technological revolution that is shifting the economic and social fabric of contemporary societies, with powerful implications for politics. In addition to shrinking labor’s role in the production of physical goods, radical technological change is reshaping a plethora service jobs from retail sales to legal, medical, paramedical, education, banking, and money management, to transportation, reducing the opportunities for decent work and increasing the possibilities for profit.

The necessity of rethinking the role of the state is particularly evident in this realm. Is it possible to build state-society coalitions that might counter the potentially dire implications of jobless growth, the degradation of work and the consequent rise in inequality? Can the more competent, connected and agile state that will be required be constructed?

Possible themes: Technology, industry/agriculture/services, production chains: the ongoing technological revolution and its impacts (robotics, nanotechnologies, artificial intelligence and massive job suppression/displacement). Knowledge creation and diffusion; technology and innovation policies; infrastructure renewal.

Chair: Jerson Lima 
2:30 – 3:50 PM 
Participants: Carlos Frederico Rocha, Luiz Davidovich

3:50 – 5:05 PM
Chair: Peter Evans 
Participants: Ana Célia Castro, Antonio Marcio Buainain, Leonardo Burlamaqui

5:05 – 6:30 PM
General Discussion: Aspásia Camargo, Fred Block, Francisco Gaetani

The transformations outlined in each of the first three sessions project an uncertain economic and social landscape, fraught with distressing downside possibilities, at all levels, from the geopolitics to the workplace. Potentially the changes underway could be turned into a process of “creative destruction,” but, existing states lack both the internal organizational capacities and the connections to organized civil society necessary make sure that the “destructive” elements don’t swamp the “creative” potential. Rethinking the state aims at building states and political coalitions that could address a range of policy agendas, including: a) possibilities for making income less dependent on employment, b) managing the conflicts among increased longevity, shrinking retirement benefits and increasing medical costs, c) how to contain and curtail the power of rentier financial capital that is at the root of both low growth in most OECD countries and rising inequality, d) how to allocate resources to roles where service provision is currently inadequate and under remunerated – e.g. child care, elder care, education and other social services changing the balance between supply and demand for workers; e) how to extract fiscal revenue from a rapidly contracting fiscal base; f) devising rules, regulations and technology to secure privacy.

The fourth and fifth sessions aim to explore possibilities for building the political and organizational foundations that might make it feasible to move toward addressing the policy agenda that is foreshadowed in the first three sessions.

PRESENTATIONS

Carlos Frederico Rocha Brazilian Innovation Policy: Important Design Issues

Ana Célia Castro Rethinking the Role of the State in Research Platforms (Knowledge Networks and Markets – KNM): the INCTs (National Institutes of Science and Technology) in Rio de Janeiro. (RJ INCTs)

Antonio Marcio BuainainWhat State? For whom and for What?

FOURTH SESSION

Rising to the challenges and forging agendas 1: Rebuilding State capacities, Creative destruction management and Social Policies

What kind of state structures, bureaucratic capacities and organizational norms would have to be in place to manage economic fragility and to generate social policies required to defend the quality of life of ordinary individuals? What are the core elements for empowering the state to strategize and manage a much more complex, and robust, policy agenda?

Possible themes: Managing epochal change: State capacities for a more complex and robust policy agenda. Reigning on Finance, finding new forms for extracting fiscal revenues, updating IP rules and regulations, detaching income from jobs, securing and expanding social and economic rights.

9:30 – 10:30 AM 
Chair: Kristen Hopewell  
Participants: Andrew Fischer, Fred Block

10:45 – 11:55 AM 
Chair: Leonardo Burlamaqui  
Participants: Celia Kerstenetzky, Lionello Punzo

11:55 AM – 1:15  PM
General discussion: Maria Antonieta Leopoldi, Renato Boschi, Peter May

PRESENTATIONS

Fred BlockState Capacity and the Problem of Authority

FIFTH SESSION

Rising the challenges and forging agendas 2: Forging new political coalitions, Renewing the core social contract and bringing civil society back in

Rethinking states to make them more agile and effective must include making room for the self-organization of civil society. When supported and given space for action, civil society has shown the capacity to integrate, supplement and often substitute for the internal capacities of both state and market, but this requires a common project. Projecting the outlines of a genuine “social contract” is one way to imagine a common project. Capitalism’s version of the social contract has always been inadequate, even in its best days, but in the 21st century it will take even greater political and analytical imagination to build an adequate social contract within the confines of capitalism. New political coalitions will have to be built. It is a project that will have implications for the organization of the State, corporations, unions, professional associations and the full range of civil society organizations.

Possible themes: Managing epochal change: State capacities and new political coalitions for a more complex and divided social landscape. Re-empowering civil society; Education, employment and Occupations; Longevity, health care and social protection; reversing inequality and enhancing sustainable development.

2:30 – 3:45 PM 
Chair: Flavio Gaitán 
Participants: Lionello Punzo, Peter Evans, Robert Wade

3:45 – 5:00 PM 
Chair: Flávio Fonte-Boa 
Participants: Renato Boschi, Ricardo Bielschowsky, Gabriel Squeff

5:15 – 6:30 PM 
General Discussion: Celia Kerstenetzky, Fred Block, Kristen Hopewell

PRESENTATIONS

Ricardo Bielschowsky and Gabriel Squeff An approach to “rethinking the state in Brazil”

Peter EvansMission Impossible? Is Capitalism an insurmountable obstacle to effective State Action?

PROGRAM and Presentations – Brasília

OVERVIEW

OPENING SESSION and FIRST SESSION

Sustainability and Climate change: Human dimension and impacts. Renewable energy, urban restructuring, redefining development

Opening Session: March 26 – 2:00 – 2:30 PM

Francisco Gaetani (Presidente, ENAP),  
Alexandre Gomide (IPEA) and  
Renato Boschi (INCT-PPED)

First Session: March 26 – 2:30 – 6:30 PM

Next, climate change and its impacts in renewable energy and urban restructuring is redefining development. The uncontrolled pursuit of profit has put this ecology in peril. Are there ways of creating state capacity that could enable society to reverse this dynamic by introducing right/decent environmental policies, sustainable energy policies and water management?

Possible Themes: Environmental policies; Human Dimension; Land and soil management; Sustainable energy policies; Water and Water management.

2:30 – 3:40 PM 
Chair: Fernando de Barros Gontijo Filgueiras 
Participants: Carlos Eduardo Young, Nírvea Ravena, Peter May

3:40 – 5:00 PM 
Chair: Flávia de Holanda Schmidt Squeff 
Participants: Estela Neves, Francisco Duarte, Maria Tereza Leopardi, Marta Irving

5:15 – 6:30PM 
General Discussion: Alexandre D´Avignon, Lionello Punzo, Mariana Clauzet, Robert Wade, Peter Evans

PRESENTATIONS

Carlos Eduardo YoungGreen Economy in Brazil: To Dream an Impossible Dream?

Nírvea RavenaSustainable Development - what do we mean?

Peter MayIntegration of Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Policies in the Brazilian Amazon

Lionello PunzoCapitalism, Finance and Democracy: Intangible assets and their values

Peter EvansMission Impossible? Is Capitalism an insurmountable obstacle to effective State Action?

SECOND SESSION

Mapping the terrain: Industry 4.0 and (major) creative destruction

We are living in the first stages of a technological revolution propelled by the overwhelming utilization of robots and artificial intelligence (AI) that will revolutionize the economic and social fabric of contemporary societies, as well as its politics. The next twenty/thirty years, radical technological change will bring bigger and more disruptive changes than the last three hundred years did. These will include legal, paramedical, banking, sales, money management, driving, office and a whole plethora of other types of work along with workerless factories. This is bound to have potentially dire implications for most its populations. Inequality will, most likely rise as well as political polarization. What economic, social and political landscapes will result?

Possible themes: Technology, industry and productive chains: the ongoing technological revolution and its impacts (robotics, nanotechnologies, artificial intelligence and massive job suppression/displacement). Knowledge creation and diffusion; technology and industrial policies; infrastructure renewal.

9:00 – 10:00 AM 
Chair: Flávio Fonte-Boa
Participants: Manoel Carlos de Castro Pires, Sergei Suarez Dillon Soares, Antonio Márcio Buainain

10:00 – 11:00 AM 
Chair: Ana Célia Castro 
Participants: Fred Block, Leonardo Burlamaqui, Leonardo Rosseti Tribst

11:00 – 11:40 AM  
General Discussion

PRESENTATIONS

Antônio Márcio BuainainChallenges for industry 4.0: beyond the economy

THIRD SESSION

Raising the challenges and forging the agenda: Forging new political coalitions, Renewing the core social contract and bringing social society back in

Rethinking the state should also make room to the capabilities of self-organization of the civil society, which (wherever existent) is showing incredible capacities to integrate, supplement and often substitute for the in-capabilities of both State and Market. How to increase both state capacities and civil society capabilities in a non-adversary way? As in all massive creative destruction processes, there will be winners and losers. But, in contrast with previous technological revolutions, the formers will likely be few while the latter, most. Note we are envisaging nothing short of a full rewriting of capitalism’s social contract that will have implications for the organization of the State, corporations, unions, professional associations and all civil society organizations. New political coalitions will have to be built.

Possible themes: Managing epochal change: State capacities and new political coalitions for a more complex and divided social landscape. Re-empowering social society, Education, employment and Occupations, Longevity, health care and social protection; reversing inequality and enhancing sustainable development.

11:50 – 12:50 AM  
Chair: Kristen Hopewell  
Participants: Alexandre Gomide, Peter Evans, Renato Boschi

12:50 - 13:30 AM 
General Discussion

2:30 – 3:50 PM 
Chair: Fred Block 
Participants: Francisco Gaetani, Moisés Balestro, Arnaldo Lanzara, Lionello Punzo

3:50 - 5:10 PM 
Chair: Francisco Gaetani
Participants: Robert Wade, Esther Dweck, Rogerio Studart, Ricardo Bielschowsky/Gabriel Squeff

5:20 - 6:30 PM 
General Discussion: Bruno Cruz, Kristen Hopewell

PRESENTATIONS

Peter EvansCan Civil Society Save us?

Alexandre GomideState capacities: IPEA research agenda

Renato Boschi and Carlos PinhoCapitalist Development, Crisis, and the State in Brazil

Fred BlockCapitalism:The Future of an Illusion

Moisés BalestroStuck in the 'cheap talk' trap? Some lessons concerning tripartism in Mexico and Brazil in a comparative perspective

Esther DweckThe current state of macroeconomic theory and the role of fiscal policy: what have they learned?

Sponsors

  • INCT-PPED
  • PPED-IE
  • ENAP
  • IPEA
  • FAPERJ
  • CNPQ